Encoded Files Folder

SM-S will only play WAV or AIFF files but you may have other file types you want to use, such as MP3 and WMA. SCS attempts to seamlessly support several file types not supported natively by SM-S. It does this by encoding a WAV file equivalent of a requested MP3/etc file, and storing that encoded WAV file in the Encoded Files Folder. So if you want to use Lilacs.wma then SCS will create Lilacs.wav and store Lilacs.wav in the Encoded Files Folder. SCS then sends a command to SM-S to open Lilacs.wav.

The encoding process is very fast so should not be noticeable except for large files. Encoding only has to be done once per file unless you make a change to the original file.

The Encoded Files Folder is named "SCS EncFiles" and will be created if necessary directly under the SM-S Audio Files Root Folder. SCS, therefore, must have full control permissions of the SM-S Audio Files Root Folder so that SCS can create the folder as well as read and write files. Note also that the SM-S Audio Files Root Folder must, repeat must be on the SM-S machine so that SM-S is not trying to play audio files being dragged across a network during playback.

In addition to the encoded files themselves, SCS keeps an index of the files. This file is named "scs_encfilesindex.scse" and is stored in the Encoded Files Folder. SCS keeps the following information for each file it encodes:

         Full path name of the original file

         Size of the original file, and date last modified

         Name of the encoded file

Using this information, when a cue requests something like Lilacs.wma, SCS scans the index to see if this file has already been encoded. If it finds an entry for this file, and the size and date last modified also match, then SCS will use the already-encoded file. If not, then a new encoded file will be created and the index updated.

If you use a audio file editor such as GoldWave to edit an MP3 (etc) file that's already been encoded, then the next time SCS is asked to use that MP3 file then it will find the date last modified has changed, and probably the size as well. So SCS will re-encode the file. Currently, this will not replace the existing encoded file but SCS creates a new file and a new index entry. [This logic will be improved later.] By the way, if you do want to edit an MP3 (etc) file, then it would be more efficient for SCS if you save the edited file as a WAV file, and change your cue(s) to use this new WAV file.

Other Files Stored in the Encoded Files Folder

As mentioned above, SM-S will only play WAV or AIFF files, and so files of other types such as MP3 are encoded to WAV format and the WAV format file is stored in the Encoded Files Folder. It was also mentioned that the Encoded Files Folder is created directly under the SM-S Audio Files Root Folder, which must be directly accessible, using the same path name, by both SCS and SM-S.

Sometimes SCS may also copy WAV or AIFF files to the Encoded Files Folder. SCS will do this if you select a WAV or AIFF file that is not in or within the hierarchy of the SM-S Audio Files Root Folder, AND If SM-S is being run on a different machine to SCS. This is to ensure that all files to be played by SM-S are accessible by SM-S.

Important Note

If SM-S is being run on a different machine to SCS, then the full path name of the SM-S Audio Files Root Folder must be the same for both machines . This is most easily handled by mapping an identical network drive on both machines, and use that network drive as the SM-S Audio Files Root Folder.

If SCS and SM-S are being run on the same machine, then any location for the folder will be acceptable.